Roses That Fend for Themselves

The long term future of rose growing must lie in breeders producing healthy roses. The time is coming when spraying will no longer be an option. Roses have less chance of getting disease when planted in mixed borders and not in a mono culture system with just blocks of roses. Just like us, the closer we are to each other, the more chance we have of catching something. Companion planting roses with other plants will be helpful. However, there are still some excellent roses out there that would make any rose garden look fabulous. The list I have produced are mostly recent varieties, and are based on either growing them myself or, watching them grow in trial beds. They are not what I would call show roses, but roses for the garden. I will produce my list of show roses shortly.

1: The Mayflower, David Austin (pink shrub)

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2: Pink Tiara, Pearce (pink patio)

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3 - Rambling Rosie, Horner (red ground cover)

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4 - Golden Beauty, Kordes (golden floribunda)

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5 - Whiter Shade of Pale, Pearce (off-white hybrid tea)

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6 - Cinderella, Kordes (pink, modern shrub)

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7 - Teasing Georgia, David Austin (yellow shrub/climber)

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8 - Champagne Moment, Kordes (blush apricot floribunda)

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9 - Jasmina, Kordes (lilac shrub) 

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10 - Home Run, Weeks (blood red floribunda/shrub)

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As well as my top 10 healthy roses, I'll also like to point out some older varieties which are still producing roses for me. These include:

Roseraie de L Hay, Cochet (purple shrub - 1902)

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Alexander, Harkness (orange-vermillion hybrid tea - 1972)

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Gordon's College (pink/purple floribunda - 1992)

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Article written by Mike Thompson